Program

2017 SCHEDULE

7:45 a.m.                                   

REGISTRATION

8:00 – 8:30 a.m.

BUFFET BREAKFAST

8:30 – 8:35 a.m.

 INDIGENOUS BLESSING
      ELDER JACKIE BROMLEY

8:35 – 9:45 a.m.

WELCOME REMARKS
            RON KNEEBONE
           The School of Public Policy, University of Calgary

8:45 – 9:15 a.m.

COST EFFECTIVENESS OF SUPPORTIVE HOUSING PROGRAMS
             ALI JADIDZEDAH
            Calgary Homeless Foundation
             DANIEL DUTTON
            The School of Public Policy
             NICK FALVO
             Calgary Homeless Foundation
              JEDD MATECHUK
             Calgary Homeless Foundation

This study investigates the impact of supportive housing programs on public service utilization for people experiencing homelessness in Calgary, Alberta. We employ data on 2,621 clients placed in supportive housing programs between 2012 to 2015 fiscal years, and assess the interaction of each client with health and justice systems before and after joining the programs. Finally, we estimate the dollar value of cost-saving associated with placement of clients in different supportive housing programs (e.g., programs for youth, families and singles).

9:15 – 9:45 a.m.

 2016 HPS POINT-iN-TIME COUNT: KEYFINDINGS AND FUTURE RESEARCH QUESTIONS
            PATRICK HUNTER
            Employment and Social Development Canada

Point-in-Time counts are used by many communities to inform service priorities and measure progress in reducing homelessness. The first nationally coordinated PiT Count took place, with 32 participating communities. This yielded several key findings and raised questions for discussions around chronic and episodic homelessness, defining and measuring hidden homelessness and trajectories for women and men.

9:45 – 10:15 a.m.
NETWORKING BREAK

 

10:15 – 10:45 a.m.

USING COMPUTER SIMULATION MODELLING TO                                                 ADDRESS HOMELESSNESS: A PROJECT BASED ON FUZZY COGNITIVE MAPS & CELLULAR AUTOMATA
          ERIC LATIMER
           McGill University

Computer simulation models have often been used to try to gain deeper insight into complex business, government and social problems. This project aims to construct a computer simulation model designed to shed light on how contextual factors and policies interact to influence the number of homeless people and the composition of this population over time.

10:45 – 11:45 a.m.

PANEL DISCUSSION – MOVING FORWARD ON HMIS
          MICHAEL LENCZNER 

          Powered by Data
          HENRY DAGHER
         Homelessness Partnering Secretariat
          TRACEY LAURIAULT
          Carleton University
          JENNIFER LEGATE
         Calgary Homeless Foundation

Homelessness Management Information Systems (HMIS) have seen considerable expansion in the past two decades, with their capability improving each year.  Yet, considerable work remains, both in terms of enhancing what they can do, and expanding their reach to new communities.  What’s the appropriate way forward for HMIS systems in Canada?  What does Canada’s federal government need to do differently?  How can communities help?  What can we learn from other countries?
MODERATOR:        Nick Falvo, Calgary Homeless Foundation

11:45 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.
Networking Lunch/Keynote Speaker

BRIAN BECHTEL, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CROSS MINISTRY AND COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP INITIATIVES

 

12:45 – 1:15 p.m.

OLD BREWERY MISSIONS SHELTER
           ANNIE DUCHESNE
           McGill University

Since 2011, the Old Brewery Mission shelter in Montreal has been building and maintaining a large dataset of nearly 90,000 unique individuals.  This long-term project has yielded results addressing many of the pertinent homelessness research questions.

 

1:15 – 1:45 p.m.

FIRST NATIONS HEALTH SURVEILLANCE IN ALBERTA
            BONNIE HEALY
            AFNIGC

For data to make a difference, clearly articulated partnerships must be established that are built on a foundation of mutual respect, which includes reciprocity.  Bonnie Healy will highlight First Nations Health Surveillance in Alberta and what partnerships have been established to support how data is being used and how First Nations in Alberta are making advances to support their respective communities.  This innovative approach was developed by First Nations communities and can be a model of best practice for other initiatives.  Come and learn about First Nations in Alberta and their efforts to improve the health outcomes of their First Nation members.

1:45 – 2:15 p.m.               

NATIONAL SHELTER STUDY
         AARON SEGAERT

         Homelessness Partnering Secretariat

The NSS looks at trends in shelter use from 2005 to 2014 based on a sample of over 200 emergency shelters across Canada.  The NSS estimates the annual number of individuals using shelters, describes the characteristics of the shelter-using population, and describes the use of the emergency shelter system in terms of average occupancy rates, bed nights used and duration of shelter stays. The original NSS looked at 2005 to 2009, this brings the statistics up to 2014 and adds some new variables such as Indigenous identity, military service and citizenship status.  Also for the first time, we look at the number of shelter users over a five-year period and introduce some new methods for analyzing duration of stay.

2:15 – 2:45 p.m.                

OPEN DISCUSSION FROM THE FLOOR

An opportunity for everyone to raise issues or concerns not yet expressed.
MODERATOR:       Dr. Ron Kneebone, The School of Public Policy, University of Calgary

2:45 – 3:00 p.m.
Networking Break

3:00 –3:45 p.m.

REVIEW OF THE DAY

RAPPORTEUR:       Dr. Stephen Metraux, Health Policy Program University of Pennsylvania

3:45-4:00 p.m.

CLOSING REMARKS
          DIANA KRECSY
         President and CEO, Calgary Homeless Foundation